:: Related Links
:: Cool Sites


Posted by admin on Jan 14, 2018

The TelegraphThe Tunisian government may increase aid for poor families in a bid to defuse tensions following anti-austerity protests that saw hundreds arrested and left at least one man dead.    Beji Caid Essebsi, Tunisia''s president,  hosted emergency talks with trade unions, employers associations, and political parties on Saturday.  "We discussed the general situation in the country and the reforms, especially socio-economic, that must be adopted to overcome the current problems," Wided Bouchamaoui, the head of the UTICA employers association, told reporters after the meeting.  Tunisian President Beji Caid Essebsi (C) attends a meeting with political parties, unions and employers following unrest triggered by austerity measures Credit: FETHI BELAID/AFP Noureddine Taboubi, the secretary general of UGTT, the country's main trade union, said no specific moves had been agreed but that measures "must be adopted" to aid needy families and improve the social safety net. A Tunisian government source told Reuters that a package of measures would include extra aid to poor families and people in need, but did not give further detail.  Peaceful protests broke out across Tunisia after the government adopted a new budget that raised taxes and pushed up the cost of living on January 1. Demonstrations escalated on Monday night as youths burned tires to block streets and clashed with security forces.  The unrest largely tailed off after the military was deployed on the streets of several cities on Thursday, but tensions remain high. Police fired tear gas to disperse demonstrators at a small protest in the central city of Sidi Bouzid overnight on Friday. Khlifa Chibani, a spokesman for the Interior ministry, said on Saturday a total of 803 people suspected of taking part in acts of violence, theft and looting have been arrested since last Sunday.  Police intervene during a protest in Tunis on January 12, 2018 Credit: Anadolu He said 97 policemen and members of the security forces had been injured over the week. It is unclear how many protesters have been injured. A man in his 40s died in disputed circumstances during unrest in the northern town of Tebourba on on Monday night. The unrest comes ahead of Sunday's seventh anniversary of the revolution that toppled the dictator Zine El Abidine Ben Ali in 2011, an event that sparked similar uprisings in Egypt, Libya, and Syria. While the other revolutions have descended into violence or given way to authoritarianism, Tunisia is widely seen as a success story of the Arab Spring.  Its democracy remains for the most part intact and a secular party currently leads the government in coalition with a moderate Islamist group.  But frustration has grown among many Tunisians over economic stagnation and unemployment.  Tunisia agreed to take decisive economic measures to bring down the country’s deficit. in return for a $2.9 billion loan (£2.2 billion) from the International Monetary Fund.

Read More at

https://www.yahoo.com/news/tunisia-considers-aid-poor-presid...

Read 2 times | The Telegraph

Related News

Recent News

• Republicans Befuddled By Trump’s Abrupt Reversal On New Russia Sanctions (Apr 19, 2018)

• Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens May Have Committed A Felony: AG (Apr 19, 2018)

• Hero Southwest Airlines pilot Tammie Jo Shults praised after landing distressed aircraft (Apr 19, 2018)

• Barbara Bush delivers Wellesley College Commencement speech (Apr 19, 2018)

• Unarmed Black Man Killed In 'Mind-Boggling,' Unjustified Barrage Of Police Gunfire: Lawyer (Apr 19, 2018)

• Is the F-35 Now the Ultimate Drone Killer? (Apr 19, 2018)

• French man becomes first person to have two face transplants (Apr 19, 2018)

• Most Expensive 2018 Ford Mustang: We Welcome Our One-Month Loaner (Apr 19, 2018)

• Sinclair Broadcast Boss Donated To GOP Rep Who Assaulted Reporter (Apr 19, 2018)

• Comey book says he threatened to call for a special counsel over Clinton emails (Apr 19, 2018)

• Trump squirming over Russia sanctions ties White House in knots (Apr 19, 2018)

• What The Southwest Flight Can Teach Us About Oxygen Masks (Apr 19, 2018)

• Listen to how Tammie Jo Shults, hero pilot of Southwest 1380, kept calm and saved her passengers (Apr 19, 2018)

• The Latest: Police release call from Starbucks employee (Apr 19, 2018)

• NYC Removes Statue Honoring 19th Century Surgeon Who Experimented On Female Slaves (Apr 19, 2018)

• Inside Barbara Bush's Quiet Yet Forceful Influence on American Politics (Apr 19, 2018)

• 'Can you speak for Alfie' father of terminally ill toddler asks Pope (Apr 19, 2018)

• 60 Seriously Delicious Healthy Breakfasts (Apr 19, 2018)

• Trump overruled Mattis on Congress vote on Syria strikes: NYT (Apr 19, 2018)

• Here's Why Congressman Blake Farenthold Resigned So Abruptly (Apr 19, 2018)

• Scientists Accidentally Create A Plastic-Eating Enzyme (Apr 19, 2018)

• Airlines inspecting Boeing planes after Southwest engine ripped apart mid-air (Apr 19, 2018)

• Iraq sentences French woman to life in jail for joining IS (Apr 19, 2018)

• 12 of the Weirdest Special Edition Cars Ever Made (Apr 19, 2018)

• Sean Hannity Defends Not Disclosing Link To Michael Cohen: 'I Have A Right To Privacy' (Apr 19, 2018)


:: Search
:: Sponsored Links